Understanding Risk Factors in a Disaster Environment: Evaluation of a Three Week Study Tour of Japan

Adam Lebowitz, University of Tsukuba, Japan, Kelsea Clingeleffer, Liana Riddington, Zara Hoare, and Warde Macintosh, University of Tasmania, provide insights into the advantages of study tour experiences.

Abstract
On-site tours of post-disaster areas can deepen conceptual understanding of risks in a disaster environment. This evaluation describes highlights of a three-week program in Japan for Australian students of disaster psychology to study disaster mitigation and management in a different cultural setting. Students visited northeastern areas of Japan affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake of 11 March 2011, and centres for learning and memorialisation (the process of preserving memories of people or events) in Tokyo. This visit allowed students to meet experts in disaster risk reduction and recovery and allowed observation of how theory and practice in these areas have been developed in Japan.

Read Australian Journal of Emergency Management, Volume 30 Number 3, July 2015, pp 62-65.

For further information contact Dr Tanya Park, Chair Blue Shield Australia 

 

Conference: 8th International Conference on Building Resilience (Risk and Resilience in Practice: Vulnerabilities, Displaced People, Local Communities and Heritages)

The 8TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON BUILDING RESILIENCE is to be held in Lisbon, November 7-9, 2018.

The theme is Risk and Resilience in Practice: Vulnerabilities, Displaced People, Local Communities and Heritages.

This places cultural heritage within the global context of disaster risk reduction and provides an opportunity for heritage to be brought into the mainstream. It also provides an opportunity for heritage professionals to discuss with a non-heritage audience the contribution of heritage to resilience building, as well as the issues we have identified as critical for reducing risks to cultural heritage. This includes discussing cultural heritage in relation to displaced communities, which in the Australian context could include Aboriginal communities and refugee communities.

The conference is structured around the four priorities for action set out in the Sendai Framework and provides an opportunity for discussion of heritage in the broader context of disaster risk reduction and resilience, as well as to present evidence based heritage case studies.

ICOMOS-ICORP is an associate partner of the conference, along with UNISDR and a number of universities and research centres from around the world that specialise in resilience and disaster and emergency management. There is a broad range of tracks proposed for the conference which are aligned with the four priorities for action set out in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction:

  • Priority 1: Understanding disaster risk
  • Priority 2: Strengthening disaster risk governance to manage disaster risk
  • Priority 3: Investing in disaster risk reduction for resilience
  • Priority 4: Enhancing disaster preparedness for effective response, and to “Build Back Better” in recovery, rehabilitation and reconstruction

Several of the tracks are expressly related to heritage, although, as heritage is part of the main theme for the conference, it would also be possible to address heritage within the other tracks on offer, although heritage is not specifically mentioned in their title. For the full range of tracks, which include among other areas cultural landscapes and indigenous heritage, refer to the conference website: http://2018.buildresilience.org

ICORP members are co-chairing the following tracks:

  • 3A – Heritages: Risk mitigation, adaptation and assessment
  • 4C – Risk and resilience issues of the architectural heritage: documentation, conservation, restoration and recovery
  • 4F – The Role of Heritage in Reducing Risks, Building Resilience, Sustaining Culture and Enabling Recovery and Healing

The call for abstracts closes this Sunday, 4 March 2018.

UNESCO’s Response to Protect Culture in Crises

#unite4heritage

Read UNESCO’s recent publication on their response to protect culture in crises, current challenges, the importance of culture in emergency situations and human rights.

“Culture implies more than just monuments and stones – culture defines who we are. it carries universal values and the many faces of our shared humanity….Protecting culture and heritage means protecting people. That is what UNESCO stands for.”  Irina Bokova, Director-General of UNESCO

UNESCO’s Response to Protect Culture in Crises