Culture Under Attack Exhibition

Every society is shaped by its social, artistic and religious histories and the cultural treasures that embody them. Because these objects are so intrinsic to our sense of identity they are increasingly targeted in modern armed conflict.

Culture Under Attack is an Australian Red Cross exhibition that highlights the impact of war on cultural heritage. The images in this exhibition reveal the tragic destruction of important buildings, monuments, objects and artefacts – things that tell the stories of who we are and where we have come from. They illustrate the impact of this loss, from the indiscriminate bombing of Europe during WWII, the burning of irreplaceable manuscripts from Timbuktu’s library, to the recent devastation in Palmyra, Syria.

Drawn from the portfolios of photojournalists across the world, Culture Under Attack also portrays the invaluable work of cultural custodians and organisations dedicated to keeping our heritage safe for future generations.

Culture Under Attack was made possible by the generous support of the Australian Government Attorney General’s Department.

https://whatson.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/events/culture-under-attack 

When
Weekdays, 10am to 7pm
Weekends, 11am to 4pm

Friday 24 November 2017 to Saturday 31 March 2018

Except Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Day, Australia Day and Good Friday

Where
Customs House
31 Alfred Street, Sydney 

Level 2
Cost
Free

 

Symposium 29-30 January 2018

2018 Symposium

You are invited to join Blue Shield Australia members and supporters at the 2018 Blue Shield Australia Symposium to be held at the National Library of Australia, Canberra, Australia.

The symposium will be held over two days as follows:

Monday 29 January 2018—Tours, Workshops and Evening Welcome Reception

Tuesday 30 January 2018—Symposium with invited speakers

The purpose of the symposium is to share expertise, experiences and case studies of the protection of cultural heritage in times of natural disaster, as well as to discuss climate change and the strategies being put in place by the sector to work towards a sustainable future. The Australia, New Zealand, Asia and Pacific Regions are often affected by natural disasters and we look forward to learning from each other to advance the work of the International Committee of the Blue Shield to safeguard cultural assets for future generations.

More information – 2018 Symposium webpages – http://blueshieldaustralia.org.au/symposium

Register your interest now.

Deakin Cultural Heritage Seminar in association with Blue Shield Australia: Heritage and spatial knowledge in the Second World War: How the ‘Monuments Men’ documented cultural property.

Date: Wednesday, 28 September 2016. Deakin Melbourne Corporate Centre, 3rd Floor, Deloitte Building, 550 Bourke Street, Melbourne, Theatre room – 2:00-3:30pm

RSVP: antonio.g@deakin.edu.au

The Anglo-US Monuments, Fine Arts and Archives Sub-Commission (the ‘Monuments Men’ organisation) was set up within the military government structures of the Allied armed forces in 1943. Part of its remit was ‘to preserve historic buildings, works of art and historical records…. by [furnishing] the ground and air forces with information as to the location of such monuments’ and to those ends the organisation, supported by largely American civilian agencies, produced a range of what might now be called ‘no-strike’ lists. This paper examines the production and evolution of this documentation by considering themes that are still issues in the production of modern cultural resource inventories. These include:

Production: Who undertook the research for these lists, and how? What were the relative roles of civilian and military personnel in this process?
Formatting: What formats and media were employed, and in what contexts?  These include typescript lists, printed booklets, and annotated maps and aerial photographs.
Data selection: What information was presented in the lists?
Magnitude: How comprehensive were the lists as inventories of cultural property, and how were decisions made over incorporation in, or exclusion from them?
Prioritisation: To what extent were priorities assigned to cultural property within the lists? Who made these decisions and how?
Dissemination: How and to whom within the Allied military structures were the lists distributed?
Reception: How useful and practical did military personnel find the lists?
All of these questions are relevant to the production of comparable lists today, and the experience of the Second World War provides us with valuable lessons in establishing such lists.

 

Biography: Nigel Pollard is Associate Professor of History and Classics at Swansea University, UK. PhD Classical Archaeology, University of Michigan 1993, with a thesis on Roman Syria, which became his 2000 University of Michigan Press monograph, Soldiers, Cities and Civilians in Roman Syria. He has done archaeological fieldwork in Syria, Egypt, Tunisia, Italy and the UK, but his main research focus now is on cultural property protection in conflict zones, both historical and contemporary. He is currently working on a monograph on the 1943 Allied bombing of Pompeii in the context of the development of cultural property protection in the Second World War, a board member of the UK National Committee of Blue Shield, ICOMOS UK member, and a member of the UK Military Cultural Property Protection Working Group.