Professor Peter Stone – Talks in Sydney, Hobart and Canberra

Peter Stone is the UNESCO Chair in Cultural Property Protection and Peace at Newcastle University in the UK; Chair of the UK Committee of the Blue Shield; and Vice President of Blue Shield International. He was previously Head of the School of Arts and Cultures and Professor of Heritage Studies in the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies at Newcastle University, UK. Before joining Newcastle he had worked for English Heritage, as a field archaeologist, and history teacher.

In 2003 he was advisor to the UK’s Ministry of Defence regarding the identification and protection of the archaeological cultural heritage in Iraq. He has remained active in working with the military to refine attitudes and develop processes for the better protection of cultural property in times of conflict. He has written extensively on this topic including co-editing, with Joanne Farchakh Bajjaly, The Destruction of Cultural Heritage in Iraq (2008) and editing Cultural Heritage, Ethics and the Military (2011). His article ‘The 4 Tier approach’ led directly to the establishment of a Joint Service Cultural Property Protection Unit in UK forces to become operational in 2019/20.

Peter will be giving a number of talks across Sydney, Hobart and Canberra. Location details below. Please click the links to access flyers for each talk.

SYDNEY

Protecting Cultural Property in Conflict: Critical responsibility or unnecessary, impossible, distraction?

Monday, 30 July 2018, 5:30PM
Quadrangle Building, Philosophy Room S249, The University of Sydney
For further details contact: info@blueshieldaustralia.org.au

Sponsored by Australia ICOMOS, University of Sydney and Blue Shield Australia

HOBART

World Heritage Sites as Ambassadors for Peace

Tuesday, 7 August 2018, 6 PM
Centenary Lecture Theatre, Centenary Building, University of Tasmania
For further details contact: peter.w.wilson@utas.edu.au

Sponsored by University of Tasmania and Blue Shield Australia

CANBERRA

Unfortunately there will now not be a public event in Canberra.